Metamorphosis

Metamorphosis

Metamorphosis is an experimental short film, filmed in and around Dublin, Ireland.
It is based on the fast, changing and ever-moving world around us, a world in constant transformation.
It begins with a mixture of shots that contemplate nature, with it’s tranquility and beauty.
Ensuing shots of fast-moving time-lapses of human activity create a sharp contrast with the nature shots.
The experimental short film builds in momentum and leaves us with an almost dizzying effect of busy-ness and constant motion that we might not always be aware of, and that takes us further away from nature and our deepest sense of self.

Norway

Norway

BEST VIEWED IN FULLSCREEN HD – SCALING OFF

– This is a compilation of timelapses filmed in western Norway last summer.

– Locations include Ålesund, Trollstigen, Geiranger, the Briksdal glacier and Urnes & Kaupang stave churches.

Available in 4K resolution

If you would like to see more of Stian Rekdal’s work, check out these links:
Facebook – facebook.com/stianrekdal
Vimeo – vimeo.com/stianrekdal
500px – 500px.com/plan9
Flickr – flickr.com/photos/stianrekdal/
RedBubble – redbubble.com/people/stianrekdal
Google+ – plus.google.com/100014998086390644292/posts

Astronomer’s Paradise

Astronomer’s Paradise

Make sure to watch this full-screen with the sound on!
Atacama Starry Nights: Episode I
Astronomer’s Paradise is the first episode of a Atacama Starry Nights timelapse movie series.

Cerro Paranal is an astronomers paradise with its stunningly dark, steady and transparent sky. Located in the barren Atacama Desert of Chile it is home to some of the world’s leading telescopes.

Operated by the European Southern Observatory (eso.org) the Very Large Telescope (VLT) is located on the Paranal mountain, composed of four 8 m telescopes which can combine their light to make a giant telescope by interferometry.

Four smaller auxiliary telescopes, each 1.8 m in aperture, are important elements of the VLT interferometer.

Walking on the desert near Paranal between the scattered stones and boulders on the pale red dust, feels like being on Mars but under the Earth sky.

Paranal was selected for cutting edge astronomical observations also because of the sky transparency and steady atmospheric condition which let astronomers peer into tiny details in the deep cosmos using giant telescopes.

This film is made with footage from the November 2011 TWAN imaging expedition to Paranal assigned by the European Southern Observatory (ESO). We photographed 14 nights in a row from usually 05:30 pm to 08:00 a.m.

All video rights reserved by Christoph Malin (christophmalin.com) and Babak Tafreshi (btafreshi@twanight.org) of The World at Night (TWAN) program (twanight.org/tafreshi).
The inside vista-observatory video is contributed by Stephane Guisard (astrosurf.com/sguisard).